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Life Cycle

“We literally had a window with a view of eternity. Once I saw it in person, I decided I never wanted to think about it again.”
This was Meghan York’s most repeated sentiment about his time in space.  The infinite void rather than inspire Meghan’s mind had provoked an existential dread. The dark emptiness was something she never wanted to face again.
Upon his return to humanity’s celestial cradle, Meghan rejected the curiosities that had to lead her to the very demarcation line of human existence and instead embraced his biological imperative to raise offspring.
“Life,” Meghan told herself, “Life is the only remedy.”
Meghan was not annoyed to be awoken by the cries of her infant son crackling over the baby monitor. She was laying in bed anticipating its calls for a midnight feeding.
The crib was against the wall opposite the door. A woven canopy of softly glowing lights gently flowed out from a fixture above casting gentle shadows on the room’s sky blue paint. Hearing the door open the baby’s cries grew sharper.
“It’s ok I’m here Meghan,” whispered as she approached the crib.
She lifted out the crying child and rocked him gently.
“Shh shh,” it’s alright she gently reassured him.
Meghan, though she felt something move against her palm under the child’s pajamas. She patted around but couldn’t find anything. She held her baby’s chubby warm cheek against her own and felt another moving lump.
She held him under the light and was horrified to see several lumps rushing along under her child’s skin.
“Oh, my god.”
In an instant, the child’s flesh appeared as if it were boiling. Its scarlet cheeks bulged as did it’s almond eyes now streaked with crimson veins. IT’s entire body began to bubble as if something was trying to tear it’s way out.  The child took in a great gulp of air and quickly expanded before exploding in a cloud of blood all over its screaming mother. 
Megan’s body went into convulsions. Warmblood drenched her hair and ran down her cheeks. In the pool of viscera at her feet that a moment before had been her child a shimmering swarm of insects that looked like a horde of rouge painted lips and teeth scurring on dozens of tiny legs started running up her legs.
Meghan tried to swat them away, but there were too many. She turned to turn run, but they were all over her now bitting and burrowing into her flesh. Her limbs went numb, and she fell into the vile pool of shredded remains. Her eyes closed and for a fleeting moment everything was silent and dark when they opened it was as if time skipped a beat and everything was calm again.
The insects were gone. Meghan stood up and without a word left the room leaving bloody footprints as she went.
She could feel them moving inside her now, but she was afraid. She was a blank slate now, without emotion and fear just a walking vessel for a cruel new life form.

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