Skip to main content

Living Hell

“I have been whispering your whole life, and now you can finally hear me.”
A raspy voice muttered in Joseph’s ear. Joseph’s slumber gave way to a consciousness gripped with panic but a body that would not move.
The first thing in his field of vision was the elongated silhouette of a millipede crawling around in the lamp hanging above his head.
“I have always been with you. I know everything you know, and I’ve seen everything that you’ve seen and a millennia more.”
“Who are you?” Joseph asked in a choked whisper.
“My name is gone forever. Just like the empire, I served” the voice said with no trace of sorrow.  “I think that’s something you must know a lot about.”
Joseph saw the legs of the millipede probing the outer edge of the lantern. The writhing extremities curled out from the shadow into the glowing light
“That scar on your forearm. You were one of the Third Reich's anointed soldiers?” The voice asked with a smug retort.
“The scar is a dead give away. The voice sighed, “Once a Hun always a Hun. I’m sure there are a few people here who want you dead. With any luck, this should be over relatively quickly for both of us.”
Over half of the millipede's long body was holding itself up over the edge of the precariously suspended light bulb. Its multitude of legs groping at the air as it felt its way over the side.
Joseph tried to call out but suffocated on the breath of his words.
“You are in hell Joseph. You are a vessel formed solely to inflict suffering on my soul.”
The millipede had spilled over to the outside was crawling its way down the slope of the light and directly over Joseph’s face.
“Forget about your fiance she's a red whore now.” The voice said sharply.
The monstrous insect was hanging from the edge of the light now, gradually more and more of its legs slipped from the edge, and hideous creature inched closer and closer its many legs reaching out from him.
“Your family’s farm is burned. Everything about you is gone.”
The blood orange insect was gripping the lightly swaying lantern by its last few legs.
Joseph let out a breathless scream as he watched the primordial terror falling into his open eye. He blinked, and it disappeared. He felt something on his shoulder, and his body jolted up.
A tall, thin-framed Leigonare holding a shovel was standing next to his bed. The brim of a cap obscured sunken dark eyes and pockmarked cheeks.
“We have a grave to dig,” he said nervously.
The inky night sky was giving way to the pink and purple hues colored in by the ascending sun. Joseph and his comrade were waist-deep in the grave and digging deeper. Every upturned layer of earth revealed writhing swarms of primordial creatures so hideous they had evolved to scurry away and seek refuge from the light of day in a sanctuary of dirt covered by stratospheres of rotting organic matter.
“These are the only things in the world you matter to now.” the slithering voice from his nightmare breathed in his ear.
Joseph stopped digging and shook his head. He looked down at his boot. The slimy tubular body of a worm wiggling in the soft dirt. Joseph drove the blade of his shovel down into its body. He lifted it from the soil and saw a moist streak of viscera on the metal.
“They will pick you clean, and I will move on just as I always have.” The voice teased.  “Do you think if your eyes are open when it happens you’ll be able to see them crawling across your face looking for a place to burrow in your ripening flesh?”
“Shut up,” Joseph whispered through clenched teeth.
The trooper in the hole with Joseph glanced up at him, but Joseph ignored him and continued digging.
The little trench they were digging into the wet jungle floor was to dispose of the remains of a Polish legionnaire, the last son of a now extinct Nobel bloodline no one could remember the name of. The thick jungle air had quickly consumed the boy alive. No matter how much necrotic flesh was filleted from his living body the rot spread. The body was wrapped in canvass and doused in petrol. The heap burned away under the tricolor flag. Joseph absent-mindedly lit a cigarette while he and the other troopers watched the pyre.
"Seems fitting, doesn't it? This jungle is nothing but an incinerator for human refuse."
Joseph ignored the musing and took a long drag from his cigarette. His hand trembled with the effort.
“Don’t worry the worms are always ok with charred meat.”

Become a Patron!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Science and Semantics

Leonard Malcon Warner was one of the God’s that reigned over the modern industry of information. The dimensions of his wealth were such that if any of it shifted in any direction, it made ripples in the economies of entire nations. His investment decisions could irreparably alter the lives of the millions unaware their personal destinies were so bound by the whims of wealth. Aging happens gradually then suddenly all at once! Before he knew it, Leonard was leaving the middle years of his life behind. He repeated every futile attempt to reclaim his youth. The cosmetics, the surgeries, and the models were all expressions of the same tragic realization, Leonard was getting old. LMW hadn't become one of the wealthiest men by accepting any sentence handed down from fate, even if it was what natural law demanded. Warner had a panoramic view of the world, and he understood what moved it. People like him. Reality need never be an impediment to human will. Science is the most effective t

Ghosts in the Memories

It was a bright and mild morning. A few billowing white clouds drifted lazily across the ocean blue sky, the gentle sun reflected off the dew coated grass and flowers, giving the world a shimmer. A human stream filled the streets and sidewalks as the city rose to life. One lonely widower had a different reaction to the beautifully emerging day. Hibiki closed the shutters on his windows, locked the door, and sat his tired old body into a reclining chair in front of a blaring television. To Hibiki, the day’s crystal sky was a dark omen and a visceral reminder of that horrific moment all those decades ago when a flash of light took away 100,000 people. Hibiki had been there when it happened. He was a doctor at the time, and while the bomb canceled the workday for most everyone else for people in Hibiki’s line of work, there was an additional layer of hell to endure. “Please...Please..help my daughter!” Hibiki could hear a woman pleading from the street below. With a trembling hand, he

On the Eve of Extinction

The river was like a massive indigo snake coiling in the shadow of the canyons its eternal flow cut out of the very earth. Somewhere along the watery corridor, settled human life grew out of the muddy banks. The tribe sustained itself on the arterial river, steadily expanding and contracting with the rhythm of its flow like a beating heart. As far as anyone in the tribe knew no other arrangement had ever existed. The river had birthed them, molding sand and clay into flesh, and infusing the husks with its life-giving waters. Life under the desert’s smooth turquoise sky seemed safely stagnant. There was no inkling, no deciphered omens, absolutely no hunch of the approaching cataclysm lurking just out of sight obscured by the landscape’s jagged ridges. Not far from the isolated patchwork of green and brown earth settled by this tribe, the scion of ancient god well into his twilight years was on the cusp of fulfilling his divine purpose. Harmakar was sitting in the dust staring into t