Skip to main content

Electric Anthropology

By the time a more advanced race dwelling among the distant stars traversed the black gulf of space and landed on earth, they found the species that had reached out into the endless void in the hope they would find they weren't alone in the darkness. The civilization that heard this cry took the initiative as a sign humanity was a species that desired mutual prosperity and cooperation and were at once eager to respond to the call.
The grand cities that had once been the steel citadels of humanities most complex social institutions were quiet ruins, and all that remained of the simian creatures were their slightly curved vertebrates and hollow skulls.
There were some salvageable remnants. The globe was littered with intact artifacts still serviceable long after it's creators vanished.  All the information generated by humans had been digitized and inscribed into the microchips of plastic devices. Everything any researcher could ever know about the enigmatic homo sapiens was locked away behind the blank polymer interface.
It was surmised electricity was what would activate the highest runes and the interstellar anthropologists set about finding a way to send a jolt of power through the corpse. The explorers were able to establish an electrical grid primitive by their standards but enough to reanimate the now stagnant digital universe.
When they peered into the electronic eyes, they saw a world frozen in time. Human history was already chronologically cataloged, and data on any point was easily accessible. They were even able to see the very moment when humans disappeared from this realm forever. There were glimpses of the divine, moments of creation, compassion, things that almost seemed impossible. But these were buried in a mountain of cruelty and chaos. The most disturbing epoch was the last stage in their decline.
They worshiped demagogs simply for being more narcissistic than themselves and celebrated themselves with digital monuments which they spent all their waking hours growing and maintaining. They integrated themes fully into an artificial world where they could indulge their worse impulses. Even after their extinction their figureheads inhabiting the information stream were still self-exultant and dangerously selfish ambivalent creatures.
The expedition launched from the stars departed from the quiet planet disappointed. They shut down the power and silenced the demigods.  They left the human artifacts in the dust and never returned. The last physical remains of humans and the word they built would be eroded away by time and completely forgotten by the rest of the universe.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

On the Eve of Extinction

The river was like a massive indigo snake coiling in the shadow of the canyons its eternal flow cut out of the very earth. Somewhere along the watery corridor, settled human life grew out of the muddy banks. The tribe sustained itself on the arterial river, steadily expanding and contracting with the rhythm of its flow like a beating heart. As far as anyone in the tribe knew no other arrangement had ever existed. The river had birthed them, molding sand and clay into flesh, and infusing the husks with its life-giving waters. Life under the desert’s smooth turquoise sky seemed safely stagnant. There was no inkling, no deciphered omens, absolutely no hunch of the approaching cataclysm lurking just out of sight obscured by the landscape’s jagged ridges. Not far from the isolated patchwork of green and brown earth settled by this tribe, the scion of ancient god well into his twilight years was on the cusp of fulfilling his divine purpose. Harmakar was sitting in the dust staring into t

In the Blink of an Eye

 Until now, the gears of history had ground at such a slow pace our perception of it was like a puzzle. The constantly shifting pieces created an eternally changing picture inhabited and shaped by generations. Progress made it possible for the change to arrive in the form of a flash just a millionth of a second long with a blinding light and the pain of flesh-searing fire that burned away the world I knew as if it were covered in lighter fluid. For us, there were no blue skies. Daytime was just when the sun was shining bright enough to penetrate through the acrid black clouds that had consumed the sky and mingled with the distant glow of the burning horizon, painting the atmosphere with blood. For an indeterminate number of hours, maybe as long as a day, it was the only thing I saw. The constant screams became white noise; as I spiraled into death, my perceptions continued to dim until there was nothing left but fear and pain. Every hour the world became dimmer, and I saw everything t

Concubine

 Himari lay in bed on her side, staring at the barren wall with dry scarlet stained eyes resting her head on her small delicate hands. Her spent, and tired body was still as a statue. The royal child left her womb, and everyone followed it to the home of her masters, and he would be raised as one of them, and she would be nothing more than just another subject. This wasn't the only child Himari had given to her imperial lord, but the first boy hadn't lasted a week before dashing his father's hopes for a worthy progeny.  When she was with child, a stupid part of her started to forget how it would inevitably end. Once the golden boy left her womb, what happened to her wouldn't matter much after.  Even after enduring the pain of childbirth, she wouldn't be given the catharsis of cradling the fruits of her labor in her arms. That had been the hardest part the first time. Watching her baby get carried away was just the first shock, though. The little prince had clawed ou